Protect our rivers

Rivers and their valleys are habitats of many species of plants and animals. Riverside meadows, forests and bushes create ecosystems of exceptional biodiversity with not much human interference. This is thanks to their natural inaccessibility, the presence of steep banks, swamps, thickets and reeds. Especially in agricultural areas, river valleys are very important ecological corridors and shelters for wildlife and birds.

Rivers and their valleys are habitats of many species of plants and animals. Riverside meadows, forests and bushes create ecosystems of exceptional biodiversity with not much human interference. This is thanks to their natural inaccessibility, the presence of steep banks, swamps, thickets and reeds. Especially in agricultural areas, river valleys are very important ecological corridors and shelters for wildlife and birds.

 

Some species of birds live exclusively near rivers. For example, a beautiful kingfisher or sand martin, nesting in burrows of riverside slopes. Even amphibious mammals, such as beavers and otters, are inseparably connected with rivers. Therefore river valleys deserve protection and exceptional human treatment.

 

Canoeists – the most frequent guests on these rivers – should feel especially responsible for preserving the natural values of the rivers across which they canoe. Especially in spring and early summer, so during bird hatching time (April - June), it is good not to go on canoe trips. It is a time when waterbirds breed their offspring, and the younglings are still helpless and can be easily shied away.

 

On rivers one should respect the nature all year long. Loud screams and noise, littering, camping and setting a fire in forbidden places are unfortunately the main sins of canoe tourism, and those should be avoided. Conscious tourists should watch in this respect both themselves and other participants of trips.

 

More and more camping sites and marinas are being created on the rivers, where you can set up a tent or rest, throw away rubbish, and so on. Following the rules of respecting the nature – only that much or so much! – this is what the permanent inhabitants of Pomeranian rivers expect from us, canoeists.

Remember that we are only guests there, and this is their home – let us respect that!